“Trojan Women” Makes Us Feel the Agony We Cause

Fringe, as I said in my last review [June 15, below] is a place where a small new troupe can try their hand at staging a classic. This year, Project Nongenue, a relative newcomer to LA, is taking on one of the most challenging plays of antiquity, Euripides’ Trojan Woman.

Among the Greek playwrights, Euripides most often retells mythic stories from a woman’s point of view (Medea, Iphigeneia in Aulis). But in handling the Trojan War, he goes all-out — instead of Homer’s 10 years of epic battles, Euripides turns our attention to a group of women on the day after it’s over.

Here, he says, is the real story; here you can learn all you need to know about war.

Elizabeth Jane Birmingham, Avrielle Corti, Celia Mandela, Taylor Jackson Ross, Liz Eldridge (photo: Olivia Buntaine)

These are Troy’s noblewomen, their fathers and brothers, husbands and sons all slain. As the Greeks torch their city, they lament their losses — and learn to which Greek each of them will be awarded.

It’s the worst day of everyone’s life. In this unimaginably bleak prison camp, the world has lost all its meaning, lost even its shape. The worst arrives when the last surviving child, a baby, is torn from its mother’s arms and taken away to be killed.

A lot like what’s happening today in Texas and California, or in the lands around Syria or Myanmar. But like Euripides, Nongenue’s artists don’t point the lesson; they focus on the women of Troy. It’s up to us to make linkages. (The play was created for Athenians to watch after their soldiers had ravaged a neighboring city.)

Hecuba the deposed queen (Taylor Jackson Ross), will be a slave to the despised Odysseus; her daughter Cassandra (Kyra Morling) foresees herself and her owner, Agamemnon, being murdered; she laughs. Hecuba’s daughter-in-law Andromache (Celia Mandela) has her baby ripped away, and learns she is claimed by his executioner.

As the day of bitterness draws to a close, Helen (Daphne Gabriel) appears, given back to the Greek husband she had fled to become a Trojan. The others vent their rage on her, whose rash infidelity caused the war. But finally, they face their common fate together.

In bringing this this play to our city, adapter and director Olivia Buntaine makes some quiet, bold choices. She makes Eris, the goddess of strife (Kay Capasso), the narrator who frames the tale; her ironic coldness shocks us, as we share the women’s suffering. Buntaine sharpens moments of love and loss with lines from the poet Sappho. And, with movement director Christine Breihan, she creates an unobtrusive ballet that ends in a breathtaking image.

Designer Cameron Rose uses a simple, powerful metaphor to shape the space — washtubs, and cloth hanging on clotheslines. This lets Eris introduce the others in a memorable device, and keeps the women busy repeating tasks from their vanished world.

Each actor carves a distinct character from clear choices, and most handle the poetry with clarity and force. Ross, Morling, Capasso and Elizabeth Jane Birmingham (as Iris) especially command attention, and Mandela, brilliant in Andromache’s long aria, gives the play its heart-rending centerpiece.

Trojan Women is a formidable challenge –the characters are from a world 3,000 years gone, they speak in elevated poetry, and their story is relentlessly painful. Project Nongenue meets the challenge; their dedication and artistry give us an hour of terrible empathy that will not allow us to forget these women — nor the ones who suffer in refugee camps and prisons all over our world.
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Trojan Women, by Euripides (translated by Gilbert Murray), adapted and directed by Olivia Buntaine.
Presented by Project Nongenue, at the Lounge Theatre, 6201 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood 90038.

June 22 (Friday) at 8;00.

Tickets: <www.hollywoodfringe.org/projects/5123>