Wilde’s final reckoning arrives in “Being Oscar”

Just over 120 years ago, the playwright and poet Oscar Wilde was released from a British prison and departed for France. There he spent the last three years of his life, separated from his wife and sons, visited by a few friends, largely alone.

At this year’s Hollywood Fringe, playwright Brandie June takes a look into Wilde’s exile. The Importance of Being Oscar began, says direct/producer Matthew Martin, as a 10-minute sketch with Oscar and one other character (his literary creation Dorian Gray). Now, at almost an hour, it also features his wife Constance, and his faithful friend journalist Frank Harris.

Richard Abraham (photo: Fearless Imp)

The three interviews succeed one another, stretching across the poet’s years in Paris (where he wrote and published The Ballad of Reading Gaol).

Harris arrives early on, commiserating, urging Oscar to reconcile with his family, and offering money. He leaves promising to approach Constance — who arrives next scene. (Harris did, in fact, work to bring them together; there’s no evidence he succeeded, though  there is lively speculation. June adroitly sets Constance’s visit in 1898; she died that April, so the Constance we see could even be a ghost.)

In June’s imagining, the estranged pair gingerly arrive at being able to admit their continuing love, although his infidelity has wrecked their marriage. But they cannot sustain the peace: Oscar won’t promise never to see his former lover, and Constance leaves.

In the final scene, a much depleted Oscar (it’s now 1900, the year of his death) is visited by Dorian, the handsome young rake who lets his portrait do the aging while he pursues a wasted life. Impervious in his egoism, Dorian (an alter ego who can’t be fooled) dishes out hard truths to his creator, who tries not to hear them.

Richard Abraham’s Oscar, clearly once an imposing presence, has lost the will for social swordplay; he is now fencing for his life against depression and drink. Patrick Censoplano’s energetic, commanding Dorian nicely reveals a few flashes of petulance and fear beneath his swagger; and Cyanne McClairian gives us a Constance struggling to advocate for herself in the face of the temptation she has never been able to resist. (In a future iteration, she might perhaps show us a little more of the crusading feminist and author who intrigued Wilde.) As Harris, Richard Lucas is given the least to do, and does it serviceably. (In the next draft, I’d hope to see the complex, world-traveling journalist and “fixer” that Harris was.)

As it is, The Importance of Being Oscar is literate, funny, interesting and lively. (June deftly uses several of Wilde’s best bon mots, and throws in a few of her own.) It still has some rough edges, and isn’t tightly woven together. But in brief compass, it explores the many  difficulties — and discovers the real importance — of being Oscar. And it seems clear that this story wants to grow further, into a full-length work. I can’t wait to see what June does with it next.
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The Importance of Being Oscar, by Brandie June, directed by Matthew Martin.
Presented by Fearless Imp Entertainment, at the Asylum Stage C, 6448 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood 90038.

June 11 (Monday), 7:00;
June 15 (Friday), 10:00;
June 20 (Wednesday), 8:30.

Tickets: <www.hollywoodfringe.org/projects/5152>

 

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